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Data Definitions for the Stakeholder Activity Reporting Form (SARF)

(A) Prevention Pillar

Data Element

Data Definition

 

A1. How many IEC materials were produced and/or distributed by your organisation this quarter (for example, books / brochures / posters / t-shirts / TV spots / radio spots / e-spots)?

IEC materials produced

Description

·         An organisation should state the total number of IEC materials that it produced for the quarter being reported on.  The produced IEC materials can include materials designed in the district but produced or printed elsewhere (e.g. in Lusaka). 

·         The question is not cumulative and therefore the figure should only include IEC materials produced for the quarter being reporting on.  IEC materials produced in the previous quarter should not be included.  IEC materials produced can include materials that have not yet been given out but are at the organisation awaiting distribution.  

Examples of IEC materials produced

·         Printed material: booklets, books, brochures, leaflets, pamphlets, posters

·         Apparel: badges, caps, t-shirts

·         Media: TV spots, radio spots, e-spots

Data collection

·         If an organisation produced 500 posters on male circumcision then the number 500 should be recorded for the relevant quarter

·         If an organisation produced a single radio spot (or programme) on issues linked to MCP then this should be recorded as 1 for the relevant quarter

·         Where an organisation produced a number of different IEC materials in a quarter the figures need to be added together and then recorded as one figure in the SARF form for the relevant quarter.  For example, 500 posters on MC, 50 t-shirts on VCT and 2 radio spots will result in a total of 552 IEC materials produced for the quarter

·         The number of IEC materials produced and the number of IEC materials distributed do not have to be related for a quarter.  An organisation can record that it produced 200 IEC materials but then record the same or completed different figure (i.e. 0, 50 or 500) for IEC materials distributed.

IEC materials distributed

Description

·         An organisation should state the total number of IEC materials that it distributed for the quarter being reported on.  The distributed IEC materials can include both materials received from other sources (e.g. Lusaka) and IEC materials produced or printed within the district

·         The question is not cumulative and therefore the figure should only include IEC materials distributed for the quarter being reporting on.  IEC materials distributed in the previous quarter should not be included.

Examples of IEC materials produced

·         Printed material: booklets, books, brochures, leaflets, pamphlets, posters

·         Apparel: badges, caps, t-shirts

·         Media: TV spots, radio spots, e-spots

Data collection

·         If an organisation distributed 100 leaflets on PMTCT then the number 100 should be recorded for the relevant quarter

·         If an organisation produced a single radio spot (or programme) on gender based violence and this radio spot was aired 20 times during the quarter then this should be recorded as 20

·         Where an organisation distributed a number of different IEC materials in a quarter the figures need to be added together and then recorded as one figure in the SARF form for the relevant quarter.  For example, 150 posters on condom use, 100 badges on VCT and 5 TV spots will result in a total of 255 IEC materials distributed for the quarter

·         The number of IEC materials produced and the number of IEC materials distributed do not have to be related for a quarter.  An organisation can record that it produced 0 IEC materials but then record it distributed 5, 300 or 700 IEC materials

A2. How many in school children aged 5-17 years received life skills based HIV and AIDS education from your organisation this quarter?

Description

·         The number of in school children should only include the 5-17 year olds that received life skills based HIV and AIDS education for the quarter being reported on

·         The question is not cumulative so the same in school children aged 5-17 years can receive life skills based HIV and AIDS education from one quarter to the next and be reported on. 

·         An organisation needs to ensure that the correct age group (5-17 year olds) is captured and the number reported is split by male and female.

Definition of in school children aged 5-17 years

·         In school children are defined as persons who are enrolled in primary school or secondary school and are within the age group of 5-17 years

·         The life skills based HIV and AIDS education must take place within a school setting either as part of a scheduled class or as an additional session during or after normal school hours.  It should involve one of more types of life skills being discussed during a session

Definition of life skills based HIV and AIDS education

·         Life-skills based education can be an effective methodology that uses participatory exercises to teach behaviours to young people that help them deal with the challenges and demands of everyday life. Whilst there is no definitive list of life skills it can include: communication and interpersonal skills; negotiation and refusal skills; empathy; cooperation and teamwork; advocacy skills; decision making skills; critical and creative thinking skills; problem solving skills; self-awareness; skills for coping with emotions and stress, and managing feelings

·         When adapted specifically for HIV and AIDS education in schools, a life skills based approach helps young people understand and assess the individual, social and environmental factors that raise and lower the risk of HIV transmission. The choice of, and emphasis on, different skills will vary according to the programme, topic and local conditions

Data collection

·         If an organisation goes into a school(s) and carries out life skills based HIV and AIDS education sessions or classes for 5-17 year olds this should be recorded using the SARF by the organisation, and should not be recorded by the Ministry of Education

·         If schools under the Ministry of Education run their own life skills based HIV and AIDS education sessions or classes for 5-17 year olds then this should be reported to the Ministry of Education who should fill in a single SARF form for a quarter

·         The age groups for Questions A2 (5-17 years) and A3 (15-24 years) overlap, which means that in school children may be double counted with the same children being recorded in both questions.  This means that Questions A2 and A3 cannot be compared and must be analysed separately.

Questions A3, A4 and A5 are linked and therefore must be reviewed together when recording quarterly SARF data.  For life skills based HIV and AIDS education activities:

·         Question A3: in school and out of school 15-24 year olds

·         Question A4: only out of school 15-24 year olds

·         Question A5: only out of school 15-24 year olds and only through one particular method, peer education

A3. How many 15-24 year olds received life skills based HIV and AIDS education from your organisation this quarter?

Description

·         The number should only include the 15-24 year olds for the current reporting quarter.  The same 15-24 year olds can receive life skills based HIV and AIDS education from one quarter to the next and be reported on.  The question is not cumulative

·         An organisation needs to ensure that the correct age group (15-24 year olds) is captured and the number reported is split by male and female.

Definition of life skills based HIV and AIDS education

·         Life-skills based education can be an effective methodology that uses participatory exercises to teach behaviours to young people that help them deal with the challenges and demands of everyday life. Whilst there is no definitive list of life skills it can include: communication and interpersonal skills; negotiation and refusal skills; empathy; cooperation and teamwork; advocacy skills; decision making skills; critical and creative thinking skills; problem solving skills; self-awareness; skills for coping with emotions and stress, and managing feelings

·         When adapted specifically for HIV and AIDS education in schools, a life skills based approach helps young people understand and assess the individual, social and environmental factors that raise and lower the risk of HIV transmission. The choice of, and emphasis on, different skills will vary according to the programme, topic and local conditions

Definition of 15-24 year olds

·         This refers to persons aged 15-24 years as the international UNAIDS M&E indicator standard defines this group as young people

·         The 15-24 year olds can be both enrolled in school and out of school

Data collection

·         An organisation should record all the 15-24 year olds that it delivered life skills based HIV and AIDS education to in a quarter â?? the 15-24 years can be both in and out of school

A4. How many 15-24 year olds in total who are out of school received life skills based HIV and AIDS education from your organisation this quarter?

Description

·         The number should only include the 15-24 year olds who are out of school for the current reporting quarter.  The same 15-24 year olds who are out of school can receive life skills based HIV and AIDS education from one quarter to the next and be reported on.  The question is not cumulative.

·         An organisation needs to ensure that the correct age group (15-24 year olds) is captured and the number reported is split by male and female

Definition of life skills based HIV and AIDS education

·         Life-skills based education can be an effective methodology that uses participatory exercises to teach behaviours to young people that help them deal with the challenges and demands of everyday life. Whilst there is no definitive list of life skills it can include: communication and interpersonal skills; negotiation and refusal skills; empathy; cooperation and teamwork; advocacy skills; decision making skills; critical and creative thinking skills; problem solving skills; self-awareness; skills for coping with emotions and stress, and managing feelings

·         When adapted specifically for HIV and AIDS education in schools, a life skills based approach helps young people understand and assess the individual, social and environmental factors that raise and lower the risk of HIV transmission. The choice of, and emphasis on, different skills will vary according to the programme, topic and local conditions

Definition of out of school 15-24 year olds

·         The term out of school refers to any person aged 15-24 years who is not enrolled in school, college or university

Data collection

·         An organisation must exclude any in school 15-24 year olds and only record out of school 15-24 year olds who have received life skills based HIV and AIDS education in the relevant quarter

·         The number can only be equal to or less than the number recorded under Question A3.  It cannot be greater than the number recorded under Question A3.

A5. How many 15-24 year olds who are out of school received life skills based HIV and AIDS education only through peer education from your organisation this quarter?

Description

·         The number should only include the 15-24 year olds who are out of school and received life skills based HIV and AIDS education through peer education for the current reporting quarter.  The same 15-24 year olds who are out of school can receive life skills based HIV and AIDS education through peer education from one quarter to the next and be reported on. 

·         An organisation needs to ensure that the correct age group (15-24 year olds) is captured and the number reported is split by male and female.

Definition of life skills based HIV and AIDS education

·         Life-skills based education can be an effective methodology that uses participatory exercises to teach behaviours to young people that help them deal with the challenges and demands of everyday life. Whilst there is no definitive list of life skills it can include: communication and interpersonal skills; negotiation and refusal skills; empathy; cooperation and teamwork; advocacy skills; decision making skills; critical and creative thinking skills; problem solving skills; self-awareness; skills for coping with emotions and stress, and managing feelings

·         When adapted specifically for HIV and AIDS education in schools, a life skills based approach helps young people understand and assess the individual, social and environmental factors that raise and lower the risk of HIV transmission. The choice of, and emphasis on, different skills will vary according to the programme, topic and local conditions.

Definition of peer education

·         Peer education is typically delivered by a person who is approximately the same age as the target group and who engages with the target group either in a small group or on a one-to-one basis, discussing issues around HIV and AIDS.

Data collection

·         An organisation must exclude any in school 15-24 year olds and only record out of school 15-24 year olds who have received life skills based HIV and AIDS education only through the method of peer education in the relevant quarter

·         The number can only be equal to or less than the number recorded under Question A4.  It cannot be greater than the number recorded under Question A4.

Questions A6 and A7 are linked and therefore must be reviewed together when recording quarterly SARF data. 

·         Question A6: only active peer educators

·         Question A7: training for only the active peer educators

A6. How many peer educators in your organisation were active this quarter?

Description

·         The number should only include the peer educators who were actually active for the current reporting quarter.  It is not meant to capture all peer educators employed by the organisation unless all of them were active. 

·         The number reported is split by male and female.

Definition of peer educators

·         A peer educator has typically undergone training consisting of at least 16 hours of contact time, which should cover all the basic information about HIV and AIDS and include at least one role play session where peer education skills are practised

·         Examples of peer educators include teachers, interpersonal communicators, drama artists and community mobilisers.

Definition of active

·         The definition of active differs, depending on the sector where the peer educators are from.  As guideline:

-   Paid civil society peer educator: active if they have worked 80 hours in the past 3 months

-   Private sector peer educator: active if they have worked 20 hours in the past 3 months

-   Volunteer civil society peer educator: active if they have worked 40 hours in the past 3 months

-   In-school peer educator: active if they have worked 3 afternoons after school in the past 3 months.

A7. Of those peer educators in your organisation who were active this quarter, how many of them received training?

Description

·         The question is linked to the number of active peer educators reported in Question A6.  The number should be reported as the active peer educators who had received training relevant to their HIV prevention work in the current reporting quarter.

·         The number reported needs to be split by male and female.

Definition of peer educators

·         A peer educator has typically undergone training consisting of at least 16 hours of contact time, which should cover all the basic information about HIV and AIDS and include at least one role play session where peer education skills are practised

·         Examples of peer educators include teachers, interpersonal communicators, drama artists and community mobilisers.

Definition of training

·         The concept of training refers to a structured session where knowledge and skills are transferred. Training is conducted by a skilled facilitator, typically using written training materials, and includes a form of assessment at the end of the training session

Data collection

·         The number can only be equal to or lower than the number reported in Question A6.  It cannot be greater than the number recorded under Question A6.

A8. How many sex workers were reached with HIV prevention programmes by your organisation this quarter?

Description

·         An organisation should state the total number of commercial sex workers reached in the current quarter through some form of HIV prevention activity or programme. The number is not cumulative.  Therefore, the same commercial sex workers can be reached from one quarter to the next and be reported on.  The figure needs to be split by male and female commercial sex workers.

Definition of sex workers

·         The term sex worker is intended to be non-judgemental and focuses on the working conditions under which sexual services are sold. Sex workers include consenting female, male, and transgender adults and young people over the age of 18 who receive money or goods in exchange for sexual services, either regularly or occasionally. 

·         Sex workers include people who may work either full time or part time, in brothels, bars, on the street or from home for example.

Definition of an HIV prevention programme

·         This term refers to the entire scope of activities aimed at keeping HIV negative individuals HIV negative. It includes health and non-health-sector services:

-   HIV preventative health services include VCT, STI treatment, PMTCT, PEP, universal precautions and blood safety

-   Non-health-sector services cover, for example, mass media campaigns, one-to-one communication strategies, peer education programmes, youth clubs, anti-AIDS clubs in schools.

A9. How many non health facility condom service outlets providing condoms to end users were supplied by your organisation this quarter?

Description

·         An organisation should state the total number of condom service outlets that it supplied condoms to for the quarter.  The question is not cumulative. The figure could be equal to or less than the total number of outlets set up by the organisation as some outlets may not have been supplied with condoms in a quarter (i.e. inactive).  For a condom outlet to be active it must have been supplied with condoms for the quarter.  If an outlet was not supplied with any condoms in a quarter then the outlet should not be recorded in the SARF form

·         The number of condom service outlets must also take into account new condom service outlets established by the organisation as well as outlets that have closed.

Definition of a condom service outlet

·         A condom service outlet can be a fixed distribution point or mobile unit with fixed schedules that provides condoms for free or for sale to the general public.  A non health facility outlet can be a bar, club, restaurant, supermarket, public toilets etc.

A10.  How many male and/or female condoms were distributed to end users by your organisation this quarter (from non health facilities)?

Description

·         The activity relates to the distribution of male and/or female condoms from programmes that are from non health facilities.  The condoms refer to both free condoms and condoms for sale (e.g. socially marketed condoms). 

·         The figure is not cumulative, so an organisation should only include condoms distributed for the current reporting quarter and should not include condoms distributed in a previous quarter.

Definition of end users

·         Distribution to end users refers to distribution to points where individuals can collect the condoms, for example, either dispensers, individual distribution, or for retail purposes.

Data collection

·         The figures reported for male and/or female condoms need to count the number of individual pieces of condoms distributed and not boxes. 

       

 

(B) Impact Mitigation Pillar

Data Element

Data Definition

 

B1. How many chronically ill people are currently enrolled by your organisation in Community and Home Based Care (CHBC) programmes?

Description

·         The figure should only include the current number of chronically ill people enrolled by the organisation in Community and Home Based Care (CHBC) programmes.  It should take into account the organisation enrolling new people in the current quarter as well as drop-outs during the same quarter.  The question is not cumulative

·         The figure needs to be split by male and female chronically ill people.

Definition of a chronically ill person

·         Chronically ill means a situation where a person is unable to perform at least two activities of daily living such as eating, toileting, transferring, bathing and dressing, or requires considerable supervision to protect from crisis relating to health and safety due to severe impairment.

Definition of a Community and Home Based Care (HBC)

·         Community and Home Based Care (CHBC) can be defined as the care given to an individual in his/her own environment (home) by his/her family and supported by skilled welfare/health officers and communities to meet not only the physical and health needs, but also the spiritual, material, and psychosocial needs of an individual.

B2. Does your organisation have a current HIV and AIDS Action Plan?

Description

·         An organisation should answer YES if it has in place an HIV and AIDS Action Plan which is current for the reporting quarter.  For example, the plan is for 2012-15 and the reporting quarter is Q1 2012.  So long as the period of the HIV and AIDS Action Plan remains valid then an organisation should continue recording YES for each quarter

·         If there is no HIV and AIDS Action Plan in place for the organisation or the Action Plan is out of date then the answer should be NO

Data collection

·         An organisation should provide a soft or hard copy of its HIV and AIDS Action Plan to the DACA / DATF as evidence that it has an Action Plan in place.

Questions B3 and B4 are linked and therefore must be reviewed together when recording quarterly SARF data. 

·         Question B3: only active PLHIV support groups

·         Question B4: only the people enrolled in the active PLHIV support groups

B3. How many PLHIV support groups set up by your organisation are currently active?

Description

·         An organisation should state the number of PLHIV support groups that it has set up for people infected or affect by HIV and AIDS and are currently active in the current quarter.  The figure could be less than the total number of groups set up by the organisation as some groups may be inactive for the current quarter.

·         The figure is not cumulative.  The reporting of PLHIV support groups must take into account new groups established by the organisation in the current quarter and exclude any support groups that have been disbanded or no longer exist.

Definition of an active PLHIV support group

·         PLHIV typically form support groups to give and receive emotional, social and spiritual support. Members help each other to improve and better manage their situation, share challenges and discuss solutions.  For a support group to be seen as active at the very least the members need to be meeting frequently.  The support group may also be carrying out additional activities such as community sensitisation, advocacy, participation in events, research, training, home based care etc.

Data collection

·         The reported number of PLHIV support groups can be less, equal or higher than the figure for the previous quarter as it will be dependent on the number of new support groups formed and/or disbanded

·         The main organisation supplying data on support groups at the district level should be .NZP+, though other organisations (for example, Government offices or private companies) may have set up support groups independently.

B4. How many PLHIV are currently enrolled in the active PLHIV support groups by your organisation?

Description

·         The figure should only include the current number of PLHIV that are enrolled in the active PLHIV support groups set up by the organisation (i.e. the support groups that are reported in Question B3).  It should take into account the organisation enrolling new people in the current quarter as well as drop-outs (people who have died or left the support group for various reasons) during the same quarter.  The figure is not cumulative.

·         The figure needs to be split by male and female PLHIV.

Data collection

·         The reported number of people enrolled in the active PLHIV support groups can be less, equal or higher than the figure for the previous quarter as it will be dependent on the number of new enrolments and the numbers of drop-outs.

Questions B5, B6, B7 and B8 are linked and therefore must be reviewed together when recording quarterly SARF data. 

·         Question B5: Total number of OVCs receiving some form of care and support

·         Question B6: Only the OVCs receiving residential care

·         Question B7: Only the OVCs receiving community based care

·         Question B8: Only the OVCs receiving psychosocial support

B5. How many OVCs in total received care and support from your organisation this quarter?

Description

·         The number should only include the OVCs for the current reporting quarter.  The same OVCs can receive care and support from an organisation from one quarter to the next and be reported on.  The figure is not cumulative

·         The figure needs to be split by male and female OVCs. 

Definition of OVC

·         Orphan: Has lost one or both parents to HIV and AIDS

·         Vulnerable: An OVC is more vulnerable because of any or all of the following factors that result from HIV and AIDS: Is HIV-positive; Lives without adequate adult support (e.g., in a household with chronically ill parents, a household that has experienced a recent death from chronic illness, a household headed by a grandparent, and/or a household headed by a child); Lives outside of family care (e.g., in residential care or on the streets); Is marginalized, stigmatized, or discriminated against

·         Child: Aged 0-17 years old, who is either orphaned or made more vulnerable because of HIV and AIDS

Definition of care and support

·         A household will have received at least one type of free basic external support to care for the child

·         The care and support can include: food and nutrition; shelter and care; protection and legal aid; health care; psychosocial; social support; spiritual support; education and vocational training; and economic strengthening.

B6. How many OVCs received residential care from your organisation this quarter?

Description

·         The number should only include the OVCs for the current reporting quarter.  The same OVCs can receive residential care from an organisation from one quarter to the next and be reported on

·         The figure needs to be split by male and female OVCs.

Definition of residential care

·         Residential care is a generic term use to include such forms of care as: Childrenâ??s Home; Care Institution; a Place of Safety, a Place of Care; Probation Hostel; Approved School; Reform School; Special Schools; or Hospital site for vulnerable children.

Data collection

·         The number of OVCs in residential care can only be equal to or lower than the number reported in Question B5.  It cannot be greater than the number recorded under Question B5. 

·         The total number of OVCs in residential care and in community care can only be equal to or lower than the number reported in Question B5.  It cannot be greater than the number recorded under Question B5.

B7. How any OVCs received community based care from your organisation this quarter?

Description

·         The number should only include the OVCs for the current reporting quarter.  The same OVCs can receive community based care from an organisation from one quarter to the next and be reported on

·         The figure needs to be split by male and female OVCs.

Definition of community based care

·         Community based care cover structures, where parents, grandparents or other close relatives, care for their orphaned grandchildren, with no government support.

Data collection

·         The number of OVCs in community based care can only be equal to or lower than the number reported in Question B5.  It cannot be greater than the number recorded under Question B5. 

·         The total number of OVCs in residential care and in community care can only be equal to or lower than the number reported in Question B5.  It cannot be greater than the number recorded under Question B5.

B8. How many OVCs received psychosocial support from your organisation this quarter?

Description

·         The number should only include the OVCs for the current reporting quarter.  The same OVCs can receive psychosocial support from an organisation from one quarter to the next and be reported on. 

·         The figure needs to be split by male and female OVCs.

Definition of psycho-social support

·         OVC programmes traditionally define psychosocial support as covering three types of support: psychological, social and spiritual.

Data collection

·         The question focuses on whether an OVC has received psychosocial support.  But an OVC can receive just this type of support or more than one type of support (see the list of care and support under Question B5).

B9. How many street children were integrated into homes by your organisation this quarter?

Description

·         The number should only include the street children for the current reporting quarter.  The same street children can only be integrated into homes in one quarter.  If they leave / move / run away from that home but are then re-housed at a later date then they should be reported under the re-integration of street children which is Question B10. 

·         The figure needs to be split by male and female street children.

Definition of street children

·         Street children are usually broken down into two broad groups:

-   Children who are forced to work on the street, to support their families' income. They will return 'home' to sleep and will return to the street the next day. They are children 'on' the street

-   Children who are forced to work on the street, to support their families' income. They will return 'home' to sleep and will return to the street the next day. They are children 'on' the street.

Definition of homes

·         This covers all types of possible homes (original family, relatives, foster homes etc.)

B10.  How many street children were re-integrated into homes by your organisation this quarter?

Description

·         The number should only include the street children for the current reporting quarter.  The same street children can be re-integrated into homes from one quarter to the next and be reported on. 

·         The figure needs to be split by male and female street children.

Definition of street children

·         Street children are usually broken down into two broad groups:

-   Children who are forced to work on the street, to support their families' income. They will return 'home' to sleep and will return to the street the next day. They are children 'on' the street

-   Children who are forced to work on the street, to support their families' income. They will return 'home' to sleep and will return to the street the next day. They are children 'on' the street.

Definition of homes

·         This covers all types of possible homes (original family, relatives, foster homes etc.)

B11.  Is your organisation currently receiving funding and/or technical assistance to provide care and support to OVCs in this quarter?

Description

·         An organisation should answer YES if in the current reporting quarter it received any funding and/or technical assistant to allow it to provide care and support to OVCs.  If the organisation has not received such assistance in the current quarter then the answer is NO

·         So long as the period of the HIV and AIDS Action Plan remains valid then an organisation should continue recording YES for each quarter

·         The figure is not cumulative.

Definition of funding and/or technical assistance

·         Funding relates to any form of financial support

·         Technical assistance is a generic term that can cover a wide range of activities to help provide care and support to OVCs such as training, capacity building, policy advice, technical guidance etc.

Data collection

·         If an organisation has received funding for a specific period then the organisation should continue recording YES for the duration of that period.  For example, funding for the period of one year would mean recording YES for each of the four quarters in a year, or funding for only six months would mean recording YES just for the quarters covered by the funding

·         Similarly if an organisation receives technical assistance on a regular basis (i.e. in every quarter) then the organisation should continue recording YES for each quarter.  If an organisation only receives technical assistance in one quarter but not the next quarter then, for example, the organisation should record YES in Quarter 1 and NO in Quarter 2   

 

(C) Response Coordination Pillar

Data Element

Data Definition

 

C1. Is your organisation implementing an HIV and AIDS workplace programme?

Description

·         An organisation should answer YES if it has its own HIV and AIDS workplace program and the programme is being implemented or followed. 

·         The answer should be NO if there is no HIV and AIDS workplace programme, or if there is a programme but the organisation is not currently implementing it.

Definition of implementing an HIV and AIDS workplace programme

·         An organisation should provide a soft or hard copy of its HIV and AIDS workplace programme to the DACA / DATF as evidence that it has such a programme in place

·         An organisation should also be able to provide evidence, either through the SARF form or through its own M&E system, that the workplace programme is being implemented.  For example, this could include information on prevention activities undertaken, care and support provided, outreach activities, budget expenditure against HIV and AIDS activities etc.

Questions C2, C3 and C4 are linked and therefore must be reviewed together when recording quarterly SARF data. 

·         Question C2: Current employees trained as a peer educator

·         Question C3: Current employees trained as a counsellor

·         Question C4: Current employees trained in other roles

C2. How many of the current employees working in your organisation have been trained as peer educators to provide HIV behaviour change services to fellow employees?

Description

·         The figure needs to state the actual number of employees that an organisation currently employs who are able to provide behaviour change services to fellow employees as peer educators.  The figure should not include the total number of all peer educators trained over time by the organisation; only the current number of peer educators working in the organisation

·         The figure needs to be split by male and female employees.

Definition of peer educators

·         A peer educator has typically undergone training consisting of at least 16 hours of contact time, which should cover all the basic information about HIV and AIDS and include at least one role play session where peer education skills are practised

·         Examples of peer educators include teachers, interpersonal communicators, drama artists and community mobilisers.

Definition of behaviour change services

·         Services and activities linked to behaviour change involve promoting tailored messages, personal risk assessment, greater dialogue, and an increased sense of ownership. Behaviour change communication is developed through an interactive process, with its messages and approaches using a mix of communication channels in order to encourage and sustain positive, healthy behaviours.

Data collection

·         An employee within an organisation can be trained in more than one role and therefore can be recorded as a combination of peer educator (Question C2), counsellor (Question C3) and/or other roles (Question C4)

C3. How many of the current employees working in your organisation have been trained as counsellors to provide HIV behaviour change services to fellow employees?

Description

·         The figure needs to state the actual number of employees that an organisation currently employs who are able to provide behaviour change services to fellow employees as counsellors.  The figure should not include the total number of all counsellors trained over time by the organisation; only the current number of counsellors working the organisation

·         The figure needs to be split by male and female employees.

Definition of counsellors

·         A counsellor will have undergone some form of recognised and accredited training programme which leads to the qualification as a counsellor

Definition of behaviour change services

·         Services and activities linked to behaviour change involve promoting tailored messages, personal risk assessment, greater dialogue, and an increased sense of ownership. Behaviour change communication is developed through an interactive process, with its messages and approaches using a mix of communication channels in order to encourage and sustain positive, healthy behaviours.

Data collection

·         An employee within an organisation can be trained in more than one role and therefore can be recorded as a combination of peer educator (Question C2), counsellor (Question C3) and/or other roles (Question C4)

C4. How many of the current employees working in your organisation have been trained in other roles to provide HIV behaviour change services to fellow employees?

Description

·         The figure needs to state the actual number of employees that an organisation currently employs who are able to provide behaviour change services to fellow employees in other roles.  The figure should not include the total number of all people trained in other roles over time by the organisation; only the current number of people trained in other roles working in the organisation

·         The figure needs to be split by male and female employees.

Definition of other roles

·         Examples of other roles could include: a person tasked with developing IEC materials for display and circulation within an organisation; the head of the organisationâ??s support group; the coordinator of the organisationâ??s HIV and AIDS programme / activities.

Definition of behaviour change services

·         Services and activities linked to behaviour change involve promoting tailored messages, personal risk assessment, greater dialogue, and an increased sense of ownership. Behaviour change communication is developed through an interactive process, with its messages and approaches using a mix of communication channels in order to encourage and sustain positive, healthy behaviours.

Data collection

·         An employee within an organisation can be trained in more than one role and therefore can be recorded as a combination of peer educator (Question C2), counsellor (Question C3) and/or other roles (Question C4)

C5. How many employees were reached through workplace programmes by your organisation this quarter?

Description

·         An organisation should state the total number of employees reached in the current quarter. Therefore the same employees can be reached from one quarter to the next and be reported on.  The question is not cumulative

·         The figure needs to be split by male and female employees.

Data collection

·         An employee covers people who receive a salary from the organisation and includes all levels of staff in the organisation. If the spouse and/or family of the employee has benefitted from or participated in a workplace programme event or activity in a quarter then these numbers should be added to the figure being reported.

C6. Does your organisation have a functional M&E system for HIV and AIDS?

Description

·         An organisation should answer YES if it has in place a functional M&E system which allows it to capture and report on its HIV and AIDS activities and is therefore linked to the national M&E system at district level.  If there is no M&E system in the organisation then the answer should be NO.

·         The question is not cumulative.

Definition of a functional M&E system

·         For the M&E system to be considered functional at the very basic level an organisation needs to be able to record and report data using the SARF form in a consistent and timely manner (i.e. quarterly and within the agreed timeframes).

Data collection

·         An organisation should provide a soft or hard copy which describes the functional M&E system that it has put in place.

C7. Does your organisation have one or more full-time M&E persons?

Description

·         An organisation should answer YES if it has one or more members of staff who are full-time, dedicated to M&E within the organisation. 

·         If there are no M&E members of staff or the person(s) are only part-time then the answer should be NO

·         The question is not cumulative.

Definition of one or more full-time M&E persons

·         For a person to be classified as full-time on M&E for the organisation then a person needs to be based where the organisation is operating/working (i.e. within the district).  If a full-time M&E person is providing support from a higher level (i.e. Province or National) to your organisation but also to other organisations then the recorded response should be NO.

What are Data Definitions?

Data Definitions intended to be used in conjunction with data collection tools such as the Stakeholder Activity Reporting Form to ensure that all partners report data in a consistent manner. The idea of data definitions is to ensure that a measure is to guarantee that the data collected is repeatable and reproducible meaning that:

Repeatable: If the same staff member collects the same measure twice they get the same answer.

Example: If a staff member counts the number of male condoms distributed by their organisation that quarter and then does so again they get the same result both times.

Reproducible: If a different staff member, or someone external to the organisation, collects the measure they get the same result as the initial staff member.

Example: If the person who normally counts the number of male condoms distributed by their organisation for the quarter (for recording on the Stakeholder AIDS Reporting Form) is away sick another person can use the data definition sheet to ensure they get the same result as if the normal staff member did the data collection.

It is absolutely essential that the data definitions are as clear as possible and the language used is easy for everyone to understand. If you have any suggestions of improvements then please contact us.